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The Song of Francis and the Animals
HARDCOVER; Published: 8/4/2005
ISBN: 978-0-8028-5253-3
32 Pages
Trim Size, in inches: 9 x 12

Ages 4-8
Full-color Illustrations Throughout

In Stock
Ships within 3 business days
DESCRIPTION
"Baa-baa," sang the lamb.
"Shoo, go play," said Francis,
but the little lamb just grinned
and trotted happily behind the man
who preached to people and dogs
and flowers and fish and frogs.
With lilting verse and playful imagery, award-winning author Pat Mora celebrates the tender relationship between the beloved saint and the animals he loved. Woodcut artist David Frampton captures the exuberant songs of Francis and the animals in charming, colorful woodcuts that underscore the harmony between humans and the natural world.

Inspired by Saint Francis's own reverence and love for animals, this book will encourage readers young and old to join in with the clucks of the chickens, the whirring of the cicadas, and the songs of the nightingale.

AWARDS and RECOGNITIONS
Society of Illustrators, The Original Art Annual Exhibition (2005)
Catholic Press Association, Second Place, Children's Books (2006)
Poetry Center at Passiac County Community College, Paterson Prize for Books for Young People, Special Recognition (2006)
REVIEWS
Publishers Weekly
"Pat Mora praises in poetry Saint Francis' calming way of communing with creatures great and small in this celebratory picture book, made all the more joyous by Frampton's handsome colored woodcuts."
New Mexico Magazine
"David Frampton's colorful woodcuts are both bold and detailed. . . . The Francis here has universal appeal as he bonds with the myriad wonders of nature."
Kirkus Reviews
"Strikingly beautiful woodcuts and an oversized format create a first-rate visual accompaniment to this imaginative story about St. Francis of Assisi. The lyrical text focuses on St. Francis's affinity with animals and describes him simply as a man who preached and sang with ‘people and dogs and flowers and fish and frogs.' . . . This treatment serves well as an introduction to the saint who lived in an down-to-earth fashion."